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#1 2009-04-01 02:43:00

Mark
DF Members
Name: Mark Mitchell
From: Hampshire
Registered: 2008-06-17
Posts: 273

Coelopidae

Does anyone know how to distinguish  Coelopa frigida from Coelopa pilipes? am I correct in assuming  frigida is bristly, where  pilipes is more hairy?

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#2 2009-04-01 12:19:48

Howard Bentley
Committee
Name: Howard Bentley
Registered: 2008-07-07
Posts: 795

Re: Coelopidae

Here are excerpts from a couple of keys; I'm afraid I don't know their provenance:

Bristles on head, legs, & tip of abdomen:    Coelopa frigida (Fabricius)
These bristles replaced by a furry pile of long, fine hairs:   Coelopa pilipes (Haliday)

Or:

Cheeks with fine hairs.  All femora & tibiae with long woolly compact hairs.  Macrosetae reduced or indistinguishable from pilosity:   C. pilipes
Cheeks covered with erect needle-like hairs.  All femora & tibiae more or less spiny. Less than 6 mm.  Internal face of protarsus 2  with a row of spinules, not with soft pliant hairs:   C. frigida

I hope this helps.

Howard.

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#3 2009-04-01 13:10:36

Laurence Clemons
DF Members
Name: Laurence Clemons
Registered: 2008-04-02
Posts: 390

Re: Coelopidae

Howard Bentley wrote:

Here are excerpts from a couple of keys; I'm afraid I don't know their provenance:

Bristles on head, legs, & tip of abdomen:    Coelopa frigida (Fabricius)
These bristles replaced by a furry pile of long, fine hairs:   Coelopa pilipes (Haliday)

Or:

Cheeks with fine hairs.  All femora & tibiae with long woolly compact hairs.  Macrosetae reduced or indistinguishable from pilosity:   C. pilipes
Cheeks covered with erect needle-like hairs.  All femora & tibiae more or less spiny. Less than 6 mm.  Internal face of protarsus 2  with a row of spinules, not with soft pliant hairs:   C. frigida

I hope this helps.

Howard.

Also pilipes is a robust black species whereas frigida is smaller, reddish brown, and has a flattened abdomen. The two are quite distinct when seen side-by side.

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#4 2009-04-03 19:19:46

Mark
DF Members
Name: Mark Mitchell
From: Hampshire
Registered: 2008-06-17
Posts: 273

Re: Coelopidae

Many thanks both for your help. I have Coelopa frigida, It seems to fit this key perfectly, being a reddish brown female fly with  bristles on the head, legs, & very tip of its abdomen. The abdomen is dorsally flattened (extremely so) as Laurence mentions. It was swept about 10 days ago from a large heap of rooting Fucus vesiculosus near Farlingtom Marshes, Hampshire (SU678043).

I guess the above almost amounts to a new key to the 2 UK species? Given how old (= unavailable) both Burnet (1960) and Egglishaw (1960) are, would it be worth someone writing a new review/key of British Coelopidae for the DF?

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#5 2012-03-14 18:19:53

afbainbridge
DF Members
Name: Anthony Bainbridge
From: Codford, Wiltshire
Registered: 2008-10-25
Posts: 39

Re: Coelopidae

I'm also researching Coelopa and am thus joining this thread, albeit several years after the last posting.    Does anyone have a copy of Burnet 1960 (Ent Mon Mag 96)?  I have a good picture of my specimen but it's far too large to meet the current limitation when posting to the Forum.

Anthony Bainbridge

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#6 2012-03-15 12:44:24

Tony Irwin
DF Members
Name: Tony Irwin
From: Norwich
Registered: 2008-03-01
Posts: 834

Re: Coelopidae

Anthony -
I'll pop a copy of Burnet in the post.
Tony

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#7 2012-03-17 04:14:12

falky
Registered user
Name: Steven Falk
From: Kenilworth
Registered: 2009-11-30
Posts: 416

Re: Coelopidae

Take a look at my Flickr site, I've just added Coelopidae to the Diptera folder with images of the two Coelopa species

http://www.flickr.com/photos/63075200@N … 600140383/

Falky

www.stevenfalk.co.uk

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