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#1 2018-05-20 19:45:36

colinleb
DF Members
Name: Colin Le Boutillier
From: Luton, Bedfordshire
Registered: 2008-03-03
Posts: 168

Anthomyid maybe

Small fly, just over 5 mm long.  I think it's Anthomyiidae but can't make it fit any of Howard Bentley's 25 most commonly found species.  I can key it to Delia pilifemur through Michael Ackland's key though, but with little confidence I am seeing the right bristles on the correct legs.  Any chance of an ID from photos please?


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#2 2018-05-21 13:15:54

AliCullaloe
DF Members
Name: Ali Shuttleworth
From: Fife, VC85
Registered: 2014-08-20
Posts: 78
Website

Re: Anthomyid maybe

I would call that Delia platura from the genitalia, though that''s a a first impression without considering any other keying

(p.s. where are Howard's common 25? Is this something I have already ....)

Cheers
Ali

Last edited by AliCullaloe (2018-05-21 13:16:37)

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#3 2018-05-22 18:02:15

colinleb
DF Members
Name: Colin Le Boutillier
From: Luton, Bedfordshire
Registered: 2008-03-03
Posts: 168

Re: Anthomyid maybe

Thanks Ali.

Howard’s list of the 25 most commonly found species is in the handout distributed at this year’s Dipterists Forum workshop at Preston Montford in February.

Following your suggestion I have had another look and think you are correct – platura does fit.

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#4 2018-05-26 16:39:46

Michael Ackland
DF Members
Name: Michael Ackland
Registered: 2008-06-14
Posts: 190

Re: Anthomyid maybe

Thee are two common species in which the males have a row of pv-setulae on the hind tibia. Part of this row of equally spaced (comb-like) setulae are visible in one of the photos. These two species are Delia platura and D. florilega. They run out in Howard's key to 25 common species quite easily. Delia florilega has a fringe of setulae on the dorsal surface of the metatarsus of the mid leg; this is absent in D. platura.

There are other Delia species with some of these characters (pilifemur for example) but this species is rare. From memory I think it is only found in Scotland on mountains! Delia setigera has a hind tarsal fringe, but the legs have yellowish knees and part of the tibiae are yellowish.

Useful little key, Howard.

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#5 2018-05-26 19:19:23

colinleb
DF Members
Name: Colin Le Boutillier
From: Luton, Bedfordshire
Registered: 2008-03-03
Posts: 168

Re: Anthomyid maybe

Thanks Michael.  It is useful to have both Howard's key and yours in the same document and having attended the study weekend on Anthos in February I am a bit cross with myself for not getting the right ID until prompted by Ali to look again.  For some reason I had missed the row of bristles on the hind tibia.  Seems especially stupid as I had specimens of both platura and florilega confirmed at Preston Montford so I can see the difference.  This specimen is platura.


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Last edited by colinleb (2018-05-26 20:32:46)

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#6 2018-05-27 15:20:44

Howard Bentley
Committee
Name: Howard Bentley
Registered: 2008-07-07
Posts: 756

Re: Anthomyid maybe

Don't beat yourself up about missing that row of bristles, Colin. Despite the fact that it's quite unmistakeable when you see it, it really is amazingly easy to miss. I've sometimes spent a lot of time on a specimen before I finally get it exactly the right angle for the bristles to come into view. It can be very irritating!

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#7 2018-05-27 19:04:56

Michael Ackland
DF Members
Name: Michael Ackland
Registered: 2008-06-14
Posts: 190

Re: Anthomyid maybe

Here is a photo of the hind tibia of Delia florilega (same in Delia platura)

Sorry it did not seem to work this time

Last edited by Michael Ackland (2018-05-27 19:08:41)

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#8 2018-05-29 14:05:27

colinleb
DF Members
Name: Colin Le Boutillier
From: Luton, Bedfordshire
Registered: 2008-03-03
Posts: 168

Re: Anthomyid maybe

Thanks Howard.

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